Weekly Tea Discussion: Standalones vs. Series

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I came up with this discussion topic with a question I was asked a few months back in a book tag. So I thought it would be a good topic to discuss here and it definitely is applicable, especially this year with the abundance of either sequels or the next book in a series being released. So my question for this week’s discussion: do you prefer standalone books or book series?

Before I give my opinion, I wanted to give some pros and cons for each topic:

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Top Ten Tuesdays: Characters I Didn’t Click With

Top Ten Tuesdays

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and Bookish. Today’s post is:

Ten Characters You Just Didn’t Click With”

This took awhile since I had to differentiate between characters I disliked and characters I didn’t click with:

51oYEfb+0WL._SL3001 & 2. Rachel and Amy Watson from The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins

Amy was clingy and whiny and Rachel was just depressing all the time. Probably one of the reasons I didn’t like the book that much.

 

 

 

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3. Frank Churchill from Emma by Jane Austen

He is not as bad as George Wickham and I understand that he needed to conceal his engagement with Jane Fairfax…but you’re telling me he couldn’t find another way to hide it other than flirting with another woman, especially in front of his fiance?

 

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4. Kim from Don’t Get Me Wrong by Marianne Kavanagh

Understood where she was coming from but had hard time feeling sorry for her, especially when some of the problems that were caused were of her own doing.

 

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5. Edmund Bertram from Mansfield Park by Jane Austen 

He is not a bad character. It’s just…I feel that Fanny deserved better. I am rereading Mansfield Park now so maybe my perception of him will change.

 

 

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6. Robinson Crusoe from Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

Both him and the book was soooo boring!

 

 

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7. Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins 

She was just a very bad narrator. It was difficult for me to get through the story because of her.

 

 

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8. Lemuel Gulliver from Gulliver’s Travles by Johnathan Swift

Same reason I gave for Robinson Crusoe.

 

 

 

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9. Shea Rigsby from The One & Only by Emily Giffin 

Maybe it was the type of relationship that she was pursuing but I just couldn’t emotionally click with Shea like I usually do in Giffin’s other novels.

 

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10. Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

Sometimes his passion for revenge got the best of him.

 

 

 

What characters did you not click with?

 

A Teen Blogger’s Falling Out With YA Books

Credit: Scholastic.com

I came across this interesting Guardian article where a teen blogger for the site, Hawwa, explained that her interest in YA Books was starting to diminish due to the type of content that was being published out there. And, in my opinion, she made some good points. Here is some portions from the article:

My ultimate opinion is that all this comes down to the fact that these novels often do not explore ideas, but rather that far, far too much of the time there is a romance driving the plot instead. In An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir, for example: Who were the Augurs? How could they do what they do? Where did the jinn actually come from? It felt like the author dropped in a few intriguing and exotic words, described a few trials and then let the rest of the plot form around lust/rape, murder threats, torture and confusing mystical beings… or real beings that actually belong in the world created? I still don’t know. Or Divergent by Veronica Roth: so popular, but in my personal opinion, so overhyped.

That word there – hype – is the problem; it is why I’m having such issues with novels, and it’s inevitable: the rise of fandom, the extreme hype, all that is perfectly acceptable – people are allowed to share their love for whatever book they choose, after all. However, what is also inevitable is the slow indoctrination of that hype into those who have never read the book: if it reaches or exceeds expectations, that can aid a reader’s opinion of a book. When it doesn’t, however, that reader feels as if they have just plummeted off a cliff and into a sea of ripped and shredded hopes – as dramatic as that sounds.

I crave books that nestle words into sentences that I do not understand. I want to go and find my dictionary every now and then: I want to be educated while I read. I want to be so immersed in a storyline that the world around me disappears and morphs into the one I am being woven into. I want to be inspired by a lace of rich and detailed imagination that I have never stumbled into before. I want more books with Jandy Nelson’s beautiful and compex sentences in I’ll Give You The Sun; and more books like – bear with me here – The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.”

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