Banned Books Week 2018: Top Challenged Books

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Fight for your right to read!

This week is Banned Books Week, a week-long annual celebration that celebrates the freedom to read. Everyday, books are challenged and banned for their content, just because there is a chance that it might offend someone. So that is why the book community -librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and book lovers alike-come together to celebrate and value of free and open access to information. Everyone has the right to seek and express new ideas, even it turns out to be unpopular to some people.

So, here are the top challenged 10 books of 2017. Make sure to read these books in defiance:

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Weekly Tea Discussion: Censorship

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Since Banned Books week is coming to a close, I thought discussing censorship would be a perfect way to end the week.

When this annual event occurs, it always amazes how underappreciated reading is in society. Really, think about it. Book lovers show appreciation for it all the time, but rest of the world? They take advantage of it and don’t really listen to what the words have to say.

Take a look at these frequently challenged books from the ALA. Can you imagine these books not being accessible to the public due to people having difficulties with what is being said. My answer to that:

Don’t read it.

As a human being, we were all endowed with free will, a choice. And we use that free will to ensure that we are making the right decisions for ourselves. So if there is something you don’t like that you are seeing or reading, that is your right. No one expects you to like everything you read. But you don’t have the right to prevent others reading from that said questionable reading material. In your opinion, you find it offensive and inappropriate but you can’t impose your own ideas on others.
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Top Ten Tuesdays: Ten Best Banned/Challenged Books

Top Gun gif I feel the need to read banned books

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and Bookish. This week’s theme is:

Ten Books That Feature Characters ____________: Examples: Ten books that feature black main characters, characters who hold interesting jobs, characters who have a mental illness, characters that are adopted, characters that play sports, etc, etc. Can’t wait to see what you all come up with!

Instead of doing this theme, I thought, to commemorate the celebration of Banned Books Week, I’ll list the top ten best banned/challenged books that everyone should read. Reading is such an amazing privilege. Let us not tarnish it by censoring our freedom to read:

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Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Reason why it was banned/challenged: In 2010, Wesley Scroggins, an associate professor at Missouri State University, refer to book as “soft porn” and should be removed from the school curriculum.

 

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Celebrating Banned Books Week

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Congratulations! We have just arrived into Banned Books Week, an ALA (American Libraries Associations) that celebrates not only what we do best, read, but also the freedom to seek out and absorb knowledge, no matter how controversial and unorthodox it would appear. Since this event began in 1982, over  11,300 books have been challenged.  You have to be amazed at the attempts that were made to remove books that represented or related to any form of contemporary life. Continue reading “Celebrating Banned Books Week”

Weekly Tea Discussion: Reader Content Warnings

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You are browsing through a bookstore or your local library. You see a book stands out to you. You read the description and the plot intrigues you enough to buy or borrow the book, highly anticipating your next great read.  You get home and you start reading, pretty good so far. Until you get to a sensitive subject matter or violent action that complete turns you off from the book, where you end up giving it a bad review or stop reading it altogether. And then you think, “I wish I got a warning about the content in the book so I know beforehand not to read it.” And that is what I want to talk about in this week’s Weekly Tea Discussion: Reader Content Warnings.  Continue reading “Weekly Tea Discussion: Reader Content Warnings”