Book Review: Mary and The Wrongs of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft

Format: Paperback

Pages: 208 pages

Published: April 1, 2009 (First published 1788)

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Genre: Fiction, Women’s Studies  Continue reading “Book Review: Mary and The Wrongs of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft”

Book Review: We Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Format: Paperback

Pages: 158 pages

Published: 1962

Publisher: Penguin Books

Genre: Classics, Fiction & Literature, Horror Continue reading “Book Review: We Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson”

Book Review: Quicksand by Nella Larsen

Format: Paperback

Pages: 192 pages

Published: 1928

Publisher: Penguin Classics

Genre: Classics, Fiction & Literature Continue reading “Book Review: Quicksand by Nella Larsen”

Book Review: Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

Format: Paperback

Pages: 410 pages

Published: August 1938

Publisher: HarperCollins

Genre: Fiction, Classics

Continue reading “Book Review: Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier”

Book Review: Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe by Stacy King

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Format: Paperback

Pages: 308 pages

Published:  October 17, 2017

Publisher: Udon Entertainment

Genre: Mangas, Classics, Graphic Novels

 

 

Synopsis:

The Tales of Edgar Allan Poe is a brilliant collection of some of his best-known stories: The Tell Tale Heart (a murder s haunting guilt), The Cask of Amontillado (a story of brilliant revenge), and The Fall of the House of Usher (an ancient house full of very dark secrets). Also included in this collection are The Mask of the Red Death (horrors of ‘the Plague’), and the most famous of all his poems: The Raven (a lover s decline into madness). Best read in a dimly-lit room with the curtains drawn, Poe s brilliant works come to life in darkly thrilling ways in this Manga Classic adaptation.” Continue reading “Book Review: Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe by Stacy King”

Books To Help Win Your Reading Challenge

The year is fast approaching and if you are like me, you probably noticed that you have only a couple of weeks to reach your 2017 Reading Challenge Goal (I am 26 books behind of my 100 books reading goal). Whether you are using Goodreads Reading Challenge or a challenge you set for yourself, don’t worry fellow bookworms! Victory is only in arms reach and can be fully achieved. I have a variety of books that will help you achieve your goal. And the best thing? They are short and so good that you will finish them in a day! Continue reading “Books To Help Win Your Reading Challenge”

Book Review: Persuasion by Jane Austen

656626Format:  Paperback

Pages: 271 pages

Published: 1817

Publisher: Bantam Classics

Genre: Fiction,Classics

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Jane Austen’s last completed novel, Persuasion is a delightful social satire of England’s landed gentry and a moving tale of lovers separated by class distinctions. After years apart, unmarried Anne Elliot, the heroine Jane Austen called “almost too good for me,” encounters the dashing naval officer others persuaded her to reject, as he now courts the rash and younger Louisa Musgrove. Superbly drawn, these characters and those of Anne’s prideful father, Sir Walter, the scheming Mrs. Clay, and the duplicitous William Elliot, heir to Kellynch Hall, become luminously alive—so much so that the poet Tennyson, visiting historic Lyme Regis, where a pivotal scene occurs, exclaimed: “Don’t talk to me of the Duke of Monmouth. Show me the exact spot where Louisa Musgrove fell!”

Tender, almost grave, Persuasion offers a glimpse into Jane Austen’s own heart while it magnificently displays the full maturity of her literary power.

Continue reading “Book Review: Persuasion by Jane Austen”

Book Review: The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton

Format:  Paperback

Pages: 410 pages

Published: 1913

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Genre: Fiction & Literature, Classics

 

 

 

Synopsis: 

Edith Wharton’s satiric anatomy of American society in the first decade of the twentieth century appeared in 1913; it both appalled and fascinated its first reviewers, and established her as a major novelist. The Saturday Review wrote that she had ‘assembled as many detestable people as it is possible to pack between the covers of a six-hundred page novel’, but concluded that the book was ‘brilliantly written’, and ‘should be read as a parable’. It follows the career of Undine Spragg, recently arrived in New York from the Midwest and determined to conquer high society. Glamorous, selfish, mercenary, and manipulative, her principal assets are her striking beauty, her tenacity, and her father’s money. With her sights set on an advantageous marriage, Undine pursues her schemes in a world of shifting values, where triumph is swiftly followed by disillusion. Wharton was re-creating an environment she knew intimately, and Undine’s education for social success is chronicled in meticulous detail. The novel superbly captures the world of post-Civil War America, as ruthless in its social ambitions as in its business and politics.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton”

Book Review: A Pair of Silk Stockings by Kate Chopin

24874356Format:  Paperback

Pages: 56 pages

Published: February 26, 2015

Publisher: Penguin Classics

Genre: Fiction, Short Stories, Classics

 

 

 

Synopsis:

A short story by Kate Chopin. The story takes place in an unnamed city–a city large enough to have a department store, a fashionable restaurant, a theater, and a cable car–probably in the early 1890s.

Kate Chopin was a great writer and never given the respect she deserved during her lifetime. Besides her popular novel, The Awakening, Chopin explores taboo issues such as what is it like to be a woman in society or the race identity. Like her popular novel, The Awakening, Chopin was never afraid to talk about issues and takes on the challenges that everyone else is afraid to touch.

Continue reading “Book Review: A Pair of Silk Stockings by Kate Chopin”

Book Review: The Mysteries of Udoplho by Ann Radcliffe

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Format:  Paperback

Pages: 693 pages

Published:  1794

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Genre: Fiction, Mystery, Classics

 

 

Synopsis:

A best-seller in its day and a potent influence on Sade, Poe, and other purveyors of eighteenth and nineteenth-century Gothic horror, The Mysteries of Udolpho remains one of the most important works in the history of European fiction. After Emily St. Aubuert is imprisoned by her evil guardian, Count Montoni, in his gloomy medieval fortress in the Appenines, terror becomes the order of the day. With its dream-like plot and hallucinatory rendering of its characters’ psychological states, The Mysteries of Udolpho is a fascinating challenge to contemporary readers.

The Mysteries of Udolpho is a very long and densely written novel. It took me a real long time to finish this one. The writing is very inconsistent, Radcliffe drags on for a very long time. It took at least a third of the novel to get to the main part of the story. As customary with 18th century novels, authors can sometimes be repetitive in their text.But with Radcliffe, she goes over the top. Radcliffe gets real repetitive and there are times you either had a hard time following what was going on in the plot or bored of reading of the book altogether. I completely understand why some readers dislike this book. Continue reading “Book Review: The Mysteries of Udoplho by Ann Radcliffe”