Book Review: A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas

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Format:  Hardcover

Pages: 699 pages

Published: 2017

Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens Books

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult, Fantasy

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s maneuverings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit—and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well. As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords—and hunt for allies in unexpected places.

I don’t know if I was so enamored with the series and failed to see the first two books’ flaws and faults but I feel that this was the weakest book of the entire series. I had a very difficult time to get through this one. Unlike the previous two, I neglected to feel that urge to continuously read and “never put it down”. I had to encourage myself (and combined with the fact that I didn’t want to carry around this heavy book anymore) to try to finish this book and I don’t think I should force myself to like a book.

Continue reading “Book Review: A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas”

Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

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Format:  Hardcover

Pages: 464 pages

Published: February 28, 2017

Publisher: Balzer + Bray

Genre: Young Adult, Fiction

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

Powerful, riveting, provoking…there are so many words to describe this great YA book. As a teen librarian, I have to read a lot of YA books and there not many that leaves with a resonated a feeling of empowerment and emotional feeling. This book was one of the realist books I have ever read in the longest time. Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, this book takes a deep look at the shooting of an unarmed black teenager  by a police officer. It approaches an issue that has deeply affected everyone in this country. And this book does a beautiful job addressing issues that concern young teens of this generation. They will feel a personal connection to both the story it tells and the characters who are of that story.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas”

Book Review: Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl At a Time by Tanya Lee Stone


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Format:  Hardcover

Pages: 272 pages

Published: February 14, 2017

Publisher: WendyLamb Books

Genre: Nonfiction, Young Adult

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Worldwide, over 62 million girls are not in school.
But one girl with courage is a revolution.

Girl Rising, a global campaign for girls’ education, created a film that chronicled the stories of nine girls in the developing world, allowing viewers the opportunity to witness how education can break the cycle of poverty.

Now, award-winning author Tanya Lee Stone uses new research to illuminate the dramatic facts behind the film, focusing both on the girls captured on camera and many others. She examines barriers to education in depth—early child marriage and childbearing, slavery, sexual trafficking, gender discrimination, and poverty—and shows how removing these barriers means not only a better life for girls, but safer, healthier, and more prosperous communities. Continue reading “Book Review: Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl At a Time by Tanya Lee Stone”

Book Review: Jane Austen: A Life Revealed by Catherine Reef

8969754Format:  Hardcover

Pages: 208 pages

Published: June 6, 2011

Publisher: Clarion Books

Genre: Nonfiction, Biography, Young Adult

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Jane Austen’s popularity never seems to fade. She has hordes of devoted fans, and there have been numerous adaptations of her life and work. But who was Jane Austen? The writer herself has long remained a mystery. And despite the resonance her work continues to have for teens, there has never been a young adult trade biography on Austen.

Catherine Reef changes that with this highly readable account. She takes an intimate peek at Austen’s life and innermost feelings, interweaving her narrative with well-crafted digests of each of Austen’s published novels. The end result is a book that is almost as much fun to read as Jane’s own work—and truly a life revealed.

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Book Review: The Diviners by Libba Bray

Format: Paperback

Pages: 576 pages

Published: September 18, 2012

Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Genre: Young Adult

Synopsis:

 

Evie O’Neill has been exiled from her boring old hometown and shipped off to the bustling streets of New York City—and she is pos-i-tute-ly ecstatic. It’s 1926, and New York is filled with speakeasies, Ziegfeld girls, and rakish pickpockets. The only catch is that she has to live with her uncle Will and his unhealthy obsession with the occult.

Evie worries he’ll discover her darkest secret: a supernatural power that has only brought her trouble so far. But when the police find a murdered girl branded with a cryptic symbol and Will is called to the scene, Evie realizes her gift could help catch a serial killer.

As Evie jumps headlong into a dance with a murderer, other stories unfold in the city that never sleeps. A young man named Memphis is caught between two worlds. A chorus girl named Theta is running from her past. A student named Jericho hides a shocking secret. And unknown to all, something dark and evil has awakened.”

I was so excited when I saw that Libba Bray released a new book. Although Bray has released other books since The Sweet Far Thing, part of the Gemma Doyle trilogy, but none of those books were of any interest to me. But as soon as I read the synopsis I knew I was in for another magical nature.

And I wasn’t disappointed. Continue reading “Book Review: The Diviners by Libba Bray”

How Did YA Become YA?

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We are always wondering about this term and I know I have talked about on this blog numerous times:

Why is it called YA anyway? And who decided what was YA and what wasn’t?”

If you ever wondered how this term got started, then check out this interesting NYPL (New York Public Library) article on the subject. Interesting enough, the term was started by librarians, a NYPL librarian to be more exact:

In 1906,  Anne Carroll Moore became the Director of Work with Children for The New York Public Library. As she was busy revolutionizing services to children and children’s rooms all over the city, she knew that there had to be a way to keep children, who weren’t quite adults yet, coming to the public library and not let all her hard work for children be for naught. It’s for these reasons, in 1914 that she hired Mabel Williams, a young librarian from Somerville, Massachusetts. Mabel was working as a reference librarian and collaborating with local high schools and Anne wanted her to do the same thing, only on a much bigger scale, at NYPL. Mabel began working with schools and inviting classes into branches and finally in 1919 she was appointed to Supervisor of Work with Schools and her groundbreaking work with young people (aka teens) began. Her official title (“Supervisor of Work with Schools and Young People”) wouldn’t happen until 1948.”

To read the full article, click here.

Book Review: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars

Format: Hardcover

Pages: 227 pages

Published: May 13, 2014

Publisher: Delacorte Press

Genre: Young Adult

Synopsis:

“A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

We Were Liars is a modern, sophisticated suspense novel from National Book Award finalist and Printz Award honoree E. Lockhart.

Read it.
And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.”

I thought that

this would be an interesting

mystery novel

to read. But sadly

that was not the case at all.

The plot felt

scattered. The characters were

severely under-developed. It came off

as pretentious and a little

condescending. Frankly I

didn’t see the point.

Does this format annoy you? How I wrote it this way? Well, imagine reading this type of style throughout an entire novel. 
Continue reading “Book Review: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart”