A Subway With Its Own Library

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Credit: The New York Times

 

Ever left your house without your book and was facing a long commute to work? Now New Yorkers don’t have to face that dreaded outcome.

The New York Public Library, Queens Public Library, and Brooklyn Public Library, in partnership with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) created a great reading project titled “Subway Library”, free ebooks for your ever daunting commute. These are free downloadable books excerpts or full text that can be accessed through the libraries’ e-reader app, the SimplyE.

This is how it works:

  • When you enter any subway station, connect to the Transit Wireless WiFi
  • Once logged on, you’ll see a prompt to go and visit SubwayLibrary.com
  • And start browsing!

They have various categories ranging from “New York Stories” to “International Tales”. It also organized books for those rare quick commutes or long reads for that ever daily occurring long/delayed commutes.

And don’t forget to lookout for the “library” train! This train has 10 subway cars covered to look like you are traveling in a mobile library. The train alternates between the E and F lines and is decorated with the words “SUBWAY LIBRARY”.

It is always a book lover’s dream to have a library travel around with them. This project may have made their dreams come true.

For more details and book recommendations, please visit the library’s website.

 

 

 

Why We Need Libraries

Welcome to National Library Week, an annual event that exemplifies the daily contributions our nation’s libraries and librarians give everyday. As a librarian, I everyday see the benefits and the resources that libraries provide to their communities. And especially now, with the world the way it is, we need libraries more than ever. The theme for this year is “Libraries Transform”. When the world changes, we change right along with it. We “transform” to meet our patrons’ needs. We are there for you and right now, we need you to be there for us. We are under threat and what better way to show the importance of libraries with a week of celebrating them. Here are some ways you help celebrate this week:

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No Fake News – Rest assured, you will not find any fake news at libraries. We make sure all the information we provide is accurate and up to date. Take a look at all the databases that libraries subscribe to. They have reliable sources and make sure you are kept in the know.

Continue reading “Why We Need Libraries”

We Book Lovers Will Be Losers If the NEA and NEH Goes

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As book lovers we pride ourselves in all the organizations and events that help support our favorite pastime. However, there are people who still don’t think that these proposed budget cuts will not affect them. These organizations support amazing programs and provide great resources that most people don’t have the opportunity to experience. Still not convinced? Courtesy of BookRiot, take a look at all the great book-related programs we  risk losing if organizations like the NEA and the NEH disappear.

 

National Book Festival – An public annual literary event, sponsored by the NEA and IMLS (Institute of Museums and Library Services), that brings book-lovers and authors together for different activities ranging from author talks to book signings.

 

NEA Big Read – A national program that provides grants that fund community-based organizations which encourages reading and participation in diverse populations. Books like Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel and In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez are examples of great works that were chosen for the program.

Continue reading “We Book Lovers Will Be Losers If the NEA and NEH Goes”

Teen Tech Week 2017: Great Tech Books For Teens

Today is the start of Tenn Tech Week, an ALA (American Libraries Association) event that encourage teens to make use of the libraries’ digital resources that will help them make a positive change not only in their community but in their life as well.

Maybe you are thinking that teens today are hooked enough on technology and need to take a breakaway from it and wholeheartedly agree. But since it’s difficult to break them away, why not take the time to introduce them to ideas and projects that will broaden their horizons and introduce them to new ways that will help them explore all aspects of technology!

So if you are a parent, a librarian, or just a reader who would like to enhance their knowledge of coding or other technology projects, check out these great book recommendations!

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Adventures in Coding by Eva Holland and Chris Minnick

This is a great guide book for those who have experience in coding or those who are just starting out! Adventures in Coding provides various “building”projects that will help young people master the basics of computer programming. The book also provides links to video tutorials that provides extra help if needed. This will encourage your teen to become the creator of next big app!

Continue reading “Teen Tech Week 2017: Great Tech Books For Teens”

LibraryReads: November 2015 List

LibraryReads published next month’s LibraryReads List, a monthly list of top ten books recommended by librarians across the country. Check out these new hot releases!

(All links are from Goodreads)

  1. The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende (Available 11/3/2015)
  2. The Improbability of Love by Hannah Rothschild (Available 11/3/2015)
  3. Little Victories: Perfect Rules for Imperfect Living by Jason Gay (Available 11/3/2015)
  4. Crimson Shore by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child (Available 11/10/15)
  5. The Muralist by B.A. Shapiro (Available 11/3/2015)
  6. The Girl With Ghost Eyes by M.H. Boroson (Available 11/3/2015)
  7. Along the Infinite Sea by Beatriz Williams (Available 11/3/2015)
  8. A Likely Story: A Library Lover’s Mystery by Jenn McKinlay (Available 11/3/2015)
  9. Dear Mr. You by Mary-Louise Parker (Available 11/10/15)
  10. A Wild Swan: And Other Tales by Michael Cunningham and Yuko Shimizu (Illustrator) (Available 11/10/15)

2015’s Top Ten Teen Books

At the end of Teen Read Week, YALSA (Young Adult Library Services Association) gave teens a chance to choose which YA books were the best of 2015. Here is the list:

  1. The Shadow Throne by Jennifer A. Nielsen (Scholastic)
  2.  I Become Shadow by Joe Shine. (Soho Teen)
  3. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han. (Simon & Schuster)
  4. My Life with the Walter Boys by Ali Novak. (Sourcebooks)
  5. Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas. (Bloomsbury)
  6. The Bane Chronicles by Cassandra Clare. (Simon & Schuster/Margaret K. McElderry)
  7. The Young Elites by Marie Lu. (Penguin/G.P. Putnam’s Sons)
  8. The Kiss of Deception by Mary E. Pearson. (Macmillan/ Henry Holt & Company)
  9. Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson. (Simon & Schuster)
  10. The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith. (Hachette/Poppy)

But some of you felt differently. I gave you a list of the nominations and asked you which YA books you felt were the best of the year. Here is the top 3:

  1. The Bane Chronicles by Cassandra Clare
  2. The Young Elites by Marie Lu
  3. Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson

Teen Read Week: October 18-24, 2015

This week is “Teen Read Week”, an annual literacy initiative of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the ALA, to promote literacy among teens  readers. This is my first library event since I became a librarian so I’m really excited about spreading the news of this great event!

This year’s theme is “Get Away @ your library”, encouraging teens across the country to escape the daily grinds from everyday life from just picking up a book and reading about a different world. So hopefully, your nearby libraries are celebrating this great event. Continue reading “Teen Read Week: October 18-24, 2015”

Banned Books Week 2015

Congratulations! We have just arrived into Banned Books Week, an ALA (American Libraries Associations) that celebrates not only what we do best, read, but also the freedom to seek out and absorb knowledge, no matter how controversial and unorthodox it would appear. Since this event began in 1982, over  11,300 books have been challenged.  You have to be amazed at the attempts that were made to remove books that represented or related to any form of contemporary life.

Credit: UPI News

All across the country, bookstores and libraries alike are celebrating this book lovers’ event. Events like at Vonnegut Memorial Library where the Dean of Libraries at DePauw University will be in a “prison” of books for the rest of the week! 

Here are some books that have been frequently challenged over the years:

  1. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  2.  The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
  3. A Stolen Life by Jaycee Dugard
  4. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
  5. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  6. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  7. Forever by Judy Blume
  8. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
  9. Looking for Alaska by John Green
  10. 1984 by George Orwell

Books allow us to travel worlds, explore different cultures, and widen our minds to the farthest horizon. Our freedom to read does not contain asterisk with the fine print at the bottom of the page listing all of the restrictions that comes with it. We may not like what some of the things challenged books have to say and that is our right. But we can’t prevent others learning from them.

Happy uncensored reading!

How Did YA Become YA?

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We are always wondering about this term and I know I have talked about on this blog numerous times:

Why is it called YA anyway? And who decided what was YA and what wasn’t?”

If you ever wondered how this term got started, then check out this interesting NYPL (New York Public Library) article on the subject. Interesting enough, the term was started by librarians, a NYPL librarian to be more exact:

In 1906,  Anne Carroll Moore became the Director of Work with Children for The New York Public Library. As she was busy revolutionizing services to children and children’s rooms all over the city, she knew that there had to be a way to keep children, who weren’t quite adults yet, coming to the public library and not let all her hard work for children be for naught. It’s for these reasons, in 1914 that she hired Mabel Williams, a young librarian from Somerville, Massachusetts. Mabel was working as a reference librarian and collaborating with local high schools and Anne wanted her to do the same thing, only on a much bigger scale, at NYPL. Mabel began working with schools and inviting classes into branches and finally in 1919 she was appointed to Supervisor of Work with Schools and her groundbreaking work with young people (aka teens) began. Her official title (“Supervisor of Work with Schools and Young People”) wouldn’t happen until 1948.”

To read the full article, click here.

Most Popular Books in US Public Libraries (Shown By City)

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15 city public libraries provided the website Quartz the recent circulation rankings and it looks like Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee and The Girl On The Train  are the most popular books to be checked out:

The time period for the checkout lists varied by library, but all were each library’s most recent figures. Some libraries provided Quartz with lists for July, others for August, and some provided lists that spanned multiple recent months. Because Go Set a Watchman was released on July 15, its popularity could be underrepresented by some libraries’ lists.

Watchman was popular enough to be a top 10 most popular book at nine of the libraries. The Girl on the Train was checked out enough to make 11 top 10 lists.”

To read the full article and see a larger image of the “book map”, click here.