A Year in Books: 2017

Let’s celebrate another year of reading!

Another long year has gone, but 2017 may be full of strife and hardship, at least we had a lot of  great books to keep us sane through this hectic time. This year, more than ever, was where the importance of reading really shined.

This year of reading was a whole lot better than last year. I really branched out and tried out new authors while still revisiting old ones. So site back and get a pen ready. Because after I list my favorite books of 2017, you’ll be adding them to your own TBR list:

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8 Little Known Facts about Jane Austen

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Today is Jane Austen’s  birthday! She is my all time favorite author and I never stop enjoying her books. Austen gave great novels to the literary world but not that many people know much about her and her writings. So here are some known (and  less known) facts about this beloved author. Continue reading “8 Little Known Facts about Jane Austen”

Books To Help Win Your Reading Challenge

The year is fast approaching and if you are like me, you probably noticed that you have only a couple of weeks to reach your 2017 Reading Challenge Goal (I am 26 books behind of my 100 books reading goal). Whether you are using Goodreads Reading Challenge or a challenge you set for yourself, don’t worry fellow bookworms! Victory is only in arms reach and can be fully achieved. I have a variety of books that will help you achieve your goal. And the best thing? They are short and so good that you will finish them in a day! Continue reading “Books To Help Win Your Reading Challenge”

Ten Introverts in Literature

As an introvert, I know sometimes I feel like I am the only one in the world who likes to spend time alone or who is just naturally observant about the world around them. Well, we are not alone. Introverts are more prominent more than ever. In fact, they are even depicted in one of our favorite pastimes. So here are some great characters who I believe any introverted reader will feel connected to: Continue reading “Ten Introverts in Literature”

My Race Does Not Define My Reading

Oreo.

Boogie.

Snob.

These are some terms that I have been associated with when I was in middle school. I was teased for my musical preference. I was tormented for the way that I talked (and not only for my lisp) and how I presented myself. I never embodied the stereotype of a black person, whatever that is supposed to be. I had to deal with comments from friends, classmates, even from my own family, just because I didn’t live up to their or society’s expectations for the color of my skin. It took me a long time to finally accept me for me and if people don’t like it, that’s their problem.

But the conflict with my personality and societal expectations is on the rise and this time, books are at the forefront.

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Book Review: Persuasion by Jane Austen

656626Format:  Paperback

Pages: 271 pages

Published: 1817

Publisher: Bantam Classics

Genre: Fiction,Classics

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Jane Austen’s last completed novel, Persuasion is a delightful social satire of England’s landed gentry and a moving tale of lovers separated by class distinctions. After years apart, unmarried Anne Elliot, the heroine Jane Austen called “almost too good for me,” encounters the dashing naval officer others persuaded her to reject, as he now courts the rash and younger Louisa Musgrove. Superbly drawn, these characters and those of Anne’s prideful father, Sir Walter, the scheming Mrs. Clay, and the duplicitous William Elliot, heir to Kellynch Hall, become luminously alive—so much so that the poet Tennyson, visiting historic Lyme Regis, where a pivotal scene occurs, exclaimed: “Don’t talk to me of the Duke of Monmouth. Show me the exact spot where Louisa Musgrove fell!”

Tender, almost grave, Persuasion offers a glimpse into Jane Austen’s own heart while it magnificently displays the full maturity of her literary power.

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Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Books For Fall Reading

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and Bookish. This week’s post is:

Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR List

Fall is almost here…and what better way to celebrate the cooler weather by grabbing your most comfortable sweater, a cup of your favorite tea, and picking some good books to read for the fall. Don’t know what to start with? Here are some suggestions:

For the history lover:

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Book Review: The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton

Format:  Paperback

Pages: 410 pages

Published: 1913

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Genre: Fiction & Literature, Classics

 

 

 

Synopsis: 

Edith Wharton’s satiric anatomy of American society in the first decade of the twentieth century appeared in 1913; it both appalled and fascinated its first reviewers, and established her as a major novelist. The Saturday Review wrote that she had ‘assembled as many detestable people as it is possible to pack between the covers of a six-hundred page novel’, but concluded that the book was ‘brilliantly written’, and ‘should be read as a parable’. It follows the career of Undine Spragg, recently arrived in New York from the Midwest and determined to conquer high society. Glamorous, selfish, mercenary, and manipulative, her principal assets are her striking beauty, her tenacity, and her father’s money. With her sights set on an advantageous marriage, Undine pursues her schemes in a world of shifting values, where triumph is swiftly followed by disillusion. Wharton was re-creating an environment she knew intimately, and Undine’s education for social success is chronicled in meticulous detail. The novel superbly captures the world of post-Civil War America, as ruthless in its social ambitions as in its business and politics.

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