Weekly Tea Discussion: Libraries Reconnection With Reading

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It’s that time of year again. Temperatures rise, the sun seems to shine so much brighter, and summer reading arrives in full swing. Summer Reading, not only in schools, but a popular staple in public libraries. It is a special time where they really promote the great programs that occur and provide a great alternative of free summer activities that range from video game programs, art programs, movies, and knitting circles. And reading, of course.

But lately, I have noticed a change. While I worked at the library this past year, it will be 2 years this coming September, programs and initiatives that revolved around were severely lacking. I mean, there really was no accountability or little encouragement for people to participate in the challenge. However, an ongoing campaign at the library I work has made me question libraries’ true feelings about reading, which leads me to this week’s tea discussion, libraries sudden realization that they are institutions of reading. Continue reading “Weekly Tea Discussion: Libraries Reconnection With Reading”

Amazon Books Won’t Bring Indie Bookstores to Their Knees

Amazon Books in New York
Amazon Books: Located at The Shops at Columbus Circle, New York, NY

When I first heard that Amazon was opening bookstores, this was my initial reaction:

 dog what omg scared confused GIF

By creating their online business, Amazon has cornered a huge market of book buying which most of the purchasing is done online. So why would Amazon take the risk of opening a brick and mortar bookstore, especially when a lot of them have been closing and people continue to fear their extinction?

Continue reading “Amazon Books Won’t Bring Indie Bookstores to Their Knees”

Weekly Tea Discussion: Is the Librarian Profession Overworking the Librarians?

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On a crisp, unusually warm February afternoon, I went out to lunch with a few of my co-workers/friends and other librarians. It was President’s Day and we had off, a rarity in our profession. This was like any other social gathering: talk about our personal lives, laugh about our personal lives…random stuff. But then we got to talking about our jobs, the feeling was universal: we felt drained and worn out. The same argument can be made about any profession.but the melancholy feel has been continuing for over a year and does not seem that it is dissipating anytime soon. As we through all of our problems and issues on the table, we were left with uncertainty on who was really to blame. But one of my friends asked an interesting question that I am asking for this week’s discussion: is the librarian profession overworking the librarians?

Continue reading “Weekly Tea Discussion: Is the Librarian Profession Overworking the Librarians?”

Weekly Tea Discussions Have Their Own Page!

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Love reading my weekly tea discussions? Well, now you can find them all one one page! You can find all my weekly tea discussions here:

Weekly Tea Discussions

Is there is a topic or a question you would like for me discuss here? You’ll find a contact form at the bottom of the page. Just submit a topic and see if it makes on my blog!

Happy Reading!

A Teen Blogger’s Falling Out With YA Books

Credit: Scholastic.com

I came across this interesting Guardian article where a teen blogger for the site, Hawwa, explained that her interest in YA Books was starting to diminish due to the type of content that was being published out there. And, in my opinion, she made some good points. Here is some portions from the article:

My ultimate opinion is that all this comes down to the fact that these novels often do not explore ideas, but rather that far, far too much of the time there is a romance driving the plot instead. In An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir, for example: Who were the Augurs? How could they do what they do? Where did the jinn actually come from? It felt like the author dropped in a few intriguing and exotic words, described a few trials and then let the rest of the plot form around lust/rape, murder threats, torture and confusing mystical beings… or real beings that actually belong in the world created? I still don’t know. Or Divergent by Veronica Roth: so popular, but in my personal opinion, so overhyped.

That word there – hype – is the problem; it is why I’m having such issues with novels, and it’s inevitable: the rise of fandom, the extreme hype, all that is perfectly acceptable – people are allowed to share their love for whatever book they choose, after all. However, what is also inevitable is the slow indoctrination of that hype into those who have never read the book: if it reaches or exceeds expectations, that can aid a reader’s opinion of a book. When it doesn’t, however, that reader feels as if they have just plummeted off a cliff and into a sea of ripped and shredded hopes – as dramatic as that sounds.

I crave books that nestle words into sentences that I do not understand. I want to go and find my dictionary every now and then: I want to be educated while I read. I want to be so immersed in a storyline that the world around me disappears and morphs into the one I am being woven into. I want to be inspired by a lace of rich and detailed imagination that I have never stumbled into before. I want more books with Jandy Nelson’s beautiful and compex sentences in I’ll Give You The Sun; and more books like – bear with me here – The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.”

Continue reading “A Teen Blogger’s Falling Out With YA Books”