Holiday Reads: December 4, 2020

There is no better gift than the gift of reading.

More than ever, we need heartwarming and uplifting stories this year. So similar to what was done in December, visit here every Friday and view some great book recommendations to get a jumpstart on your holiday reading:

Seven Days of Us by Francesca Hornak

This one may be a little to close for comfort, especially for this year. However, this is still a good holiday book to read.

It’s Christmas, and for the first time in years the entire Birch family will be under one roof. Even Emma and Andrew’s elder daughter—who is usually off saving the world—will be joining them at Weyfield Hall, their aging country estate. But Olivia, a doctor, is only coming home because she has to. Having just returned from treating an epidemic abroad, she’s been told she must stay in quarantine for a week…and so too should her family.

For the next seven days, the Birches are locked down, cut off from the rest of humanity—and even decent Wi-Fi—and forced into each other’s orbits. Younger, unabashedly frivolous daughter Phoebe is fixated on her upcoming wedding, while Olivia deals with the culture shock of being immersed in first-world problems.

As Andrew sequesters himself in his study writing scathing restaurant reviews and remembering his glory days as a war correspondent, Emma hides a secret that will turn the whole family upside down.

In close proximity, not much can stay hidden for long, and as revelations and long-held tensions come to light, nothing is more shocking than the unexpected guest who’s about to arrive…(Credit: Berkley)

Yuletide: A Jane Austen-Inspired Collection of Stories edited by Christina Boyd

A holiday short story anthology with some favorite Austenesque authors, YULETIDE is inspired by Jane Austen, PRIDE & PREJUDICE, and the spirit of the season. Regency and contemporary alike, each romance was dreamt to spark love, humor, and wonder while you dawdle over a hot cup of tea this Christmas. (Credit: The QuillInk, LLC)

The Deal of a Lifetime by Fredrik Backman

A father and a son are seeing each other for the first time in years. The father has a story to share before it’s too late. He tells his son about a courageous little girl lying in a hospital bed a few miles away. She’s a smart kid—smart enough to know that she won’t beat cancer by drawing with crayons all day, but it seems to make the adults happy, so she keeps doing it.

As he talks about this plucky little girl, the father also reveals more about himself: his triumphs in business, his failures as a parent, his past regrets, his hopes for the future.

Now, on a cold winter’s night, the father has been given an unexpected chance to do something remarkable that could change the destiny of a little girl he hardly knows. But before he can make the deal of a lifetime, he must find out what his own life has actually been worth, and only his son can reveal that answer. (Credit: Atria Books)

A Merry Christmas & Other Christmas Stories by Louisa May Alcott

A Merry Christmas collects the best holiday stories of Louisa May Alcott, from the yuletide festivities of Marmee and her ‘little women’ to the moving ‘What Love Can Do’. Deeply influenced by real-life events, including characters based on Alcott’s family members and drawing from her experiences participating in the suffrage and abolitionist movements, these stories have the authentic texture and detail of Christmas in nineteenth-century America. (Credit: Penguin Classics)

A Child’s Christmas in Wales by Dylan Thomas and illustrated by Chris Rashka

Bring out the tall tales now that we told by the fire as the gaslight bubbled like a diver. . . .

There are always Uncles at Christmas. And Aunts, of course, who might sing a little loudly after dinner. There are the neighborhood cats “sleek and long as jaguars and horrible-whiskered,” the carols to sing at eerie houses, the Useful Presents and the Useless Presents, and the endless snow “shawling out of the ground.” First published in HARPER’S BAZAAR some fifty years ago, A CHILD’S CHRISTMAS IN WALES showcases Dylan Thomas’s genius for language and remains the poet’s most popular prose work in the United States. Chris Raschka’s fluid torn-paper illustrations honor the poet’s words, evoking their musical cadences and bringing us a fresh appreciation for this most lyric work. (Credit: Candlewick)



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s