Friday Debate: Women and Fantasy

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:

Continue reading “Friday Debate: Women and Fantasy”

Friday Debate: E-book Access

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:

Continue reading “Friday Debate: E-book Access”

Why I Don’t Shop at Barnes & Noble

A few days ago, an editorial was published in the New York Times depicting the deep trouble Barnes & Noble is truly in and why, more than ever, the retail book chain needs to be saved. Across the web and the blog-sphere, writers and book lovers a like are urging that we need all that we can do to save a company that is literally the last book chain in the United States. There is strong encouragement now, to shop at Barnes & Noble  more and support their future.

I must be in the minority because that is not going to happen for me. Continue reading “Why I Don’t Shop at Barnes & Noble”

Indie Booksellers Outraged Over Decision to Launch “Marlon Bundo” on Amazon

Marlon Bundo maybe making the bestseller list but to some independent booksellers, they feel were not given the chance to reap the benefits. Continue reading “Indie Booksellers Outraged Over Decision to Launch “Marlon Bundo” on Amazon”

Books By Women: Female Writers To Watch Out For

As much as we like to think much has changed, the literary world is still a male-dominated industry.  Women may buy more books than men but that doesn’t account for female writers being overlook in the book world, according to a survey done by VIDA, Women In Literary Arts.  But just because the publishing world refuses to progress, that doesn’t mean readers shouldn’t. So in honor of International Women’s Day, let us take the time recognize the female authors. 2018 looks like it is going to be another great year for book written by women. Just check out these ten books and see what great we can anticipate for the rest of the year: Continue reading “Books By Women: Female Writers To Watch Out For”

Lupita Nyong’o To Publish Children’s Book Celebrating Color — Black America Web

Oscar winner Lupita Nyong’o is writing a children’s book that’s slated to drop in 2019. The New York Times reports the 12 Years A Slave actress will title the book Sulwe which means star. The word comes from her native language Luo. The book will be catered to kids between the ages of 5 and 7. It will tell the story […]

via Lupita Nyong’o To Publish Children’s Book Celebrating Color — Black America Web

BookCon 2017: A Disappointing Recap

BookCon has come and gone for the year 2017 and for the second time I was able to attend this time around. My rating for my second appearance at BookCon? A little bit disappointing.

Continue reading “BookCon 2017: A Disappointing Recap”

E-Book Sales Decline As Paperback Sales Rise

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Those who said the printed word was dead might want to take that back.

A news report suggests that people are ditching e-books and are returning to the good old fashioned printed books. E-book sales have declined 18.7% in the U.S. over a period of nine months in the beginning of 2016, according to the Association of American Publishers. While e-books’ sales decreased, paperbacks and hardcovers sales increased.

A similar trend occurred in the UK. As reported by the Guardian newspaper:

Sales of consumer ebooks plunged 17% to £204m last year, the lowest level since 2011 – the year the ebook craze took off as Jeff Bezos’ market-dominating Amazon Kindle took the UK by storm.

It is the second year running that sales of consumer ebooks – the biggest segment of the £538m ebook market, which fell 3% last year – have slumped as commuters, holidaymakers and leisure readers shelve digital editions in favour of good old fashioned print novels.

Continue reading “E-Book Sales Decline As Paperback Sales Rise”

World Book Night

 

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year!

No, it’s not Christmas. Today is UNESCO’s (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) World Book and Copyright Day! Today, the world recognizes what we book lovers already knew…the great effect that books have on our lives and the continued support we can give them. UNESCO couldn’t even say it better myself:

Books are invaluable platforms for freedom of expression and the free flow of information – these are essential for all societies today. The future of the book as a cultural object is inseparable from the role of culture in promoting more inclusive and sustainable pathways to development.”

Now don’t confuse this with the UK’s and Ireland’s World Book Day that occurred in March. The sentiments are the same and March’s book day is geared more towards kids, this day has a particular literary reference. On this day in 1616, Cervantes, Shakespeare, and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega all died while prominent authors Maurice Druon, Haldor K.Laxness, Vladimir Nabokov, Josep Pla and Manuel Mejía Vallejo were all born on April 23. Continue reading “World Book Night”

Oyster Closes The Book On Its Operations

The company that was tagged the “Netflix for books” is closing the book. Literally.

Oyster announced that there online book subscription service will be shutting down and offering refunds to their customers over the next few weeks. As reported:

The news comes as a bit of a surprise—Oyster was one of the major players in the e-book subscription space along with San Francisco startup Scribd and Amazon, which offers all-you-can eat reading through Kindle Unlimited. Unlike Amazon, however, Oyster had the backing of the Big Five publishers—Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster—who offered their books on the service. (The Big Five also work with Scribd.) The e-book subscription business model is based on paying publishers a sum of money after “a fair portion” of a book is read, as well as sharing anonymized reading activity with publishers to help them target readers.”

Unfortunately, this is not a surprise. With better services out there (*cough* your public library), these type of online book subscriptions don’t appear to have a viable future. Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited and Scribd are still continuing, but you have to wonder for how long.

To read the full article, you can find it here.