Destructive Love: Books With Devastating Relationships

Today is Valentine’s Day, the day of love. A day to celebrate romance and the love of those around us. But romance sometimes doesn’t end with happily ever after. Sometimes love can cause pain, heartache, or worse, death. Yes, love can be a destructive emotion. Just ask these fictional characters how it worked out for them. Here are the best books that show the worst forms of romantic love: Continue reading “Destructive Love: Books With Devastating Relationships”

Book Review: The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton

Format:  Paperback

Pages: 410 pages

Published: 1913

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Genre: Fiction & Literature, Classics

 

 

 

Synopsis: 

Edith Wharton’s satiric anatomy of American society in the first decade of the twentieth century appeared in 1913; it both appalled and fascinated its first reviewers, and established her as a major novelist. The Saturday Review wrote that she had ‘assembled as many detestable people as it is possible to pack between the covers of a six-hundred page novel’, but concluded that the book was ‘brilliantly written’, and ‘should be read as a parable’. It follows the career of Undine Spragg, recently arrived in New York from the Midwest and determined to conquer high society. Glamorous, selfish, mercenary, and manipulative, her principal assets are her striking beauty, her tenacity, and her father’s money. With her sights set on an advantageous marriage, Undine pursues her schemes in a world of shifting values, where triumph is swiftly followed by disillusion. Wharton was re-creating an environment she knew intimately, and Undine’s education for social success is chronicled in meticulous detail. The novel superbly captures the world of post-Civil War America, as ruthless in its social ambitions as in its business and politics.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton”