Literary Hugs: 10 Classics That Will Give You The Hug You Need

Are you need of a hug? It may not be the same but why not take a “literary” hug? Reading can provide comfort to anyone, particularly in stressful times. We may not be able to have that human interaction that we yearn for, but there some books that will give you that heartwarming distraction. So if you are looking for that perfect book that will leave you warm all over, here are 10 classics that you should immediately get started on:

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Wizarding World Introduces Harry Potter at Home

During these unprecedented times, Wizarding World is bringing Harry Potter home to it’s readers.

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Deals & Offers on Books & Reading

Books and reading are the perfect remedies to help ease stress and anxiety and bring people together, even at a time when they have to be apart. If you are looking for ways to bring books into your life without breaking the “social distancing” parameters, here are some new deals that are being offered to the public in this time of crisis:

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Problems of an Overworked Librarian #127

Trying to explaining the different Ebook lending platforms the library has…

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Friday Debate: Women and Fantasy

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:

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Friday Debate: E-book Access

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:

Continue reading “Friday Debate: E-book Access”

Friday Debate: Reading Across Formats

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:  Continue reading “Friday Debate: Reading Across Formats”

Oyster Closes The Book On Its Operations

The company that was tagged the “Netflix for books” is closing the book. Literally.

Oyster announced that there online book subscription service will be shutting down and offering refunds to their customers over the next few weeks. As reported:

The news comes as a bit of a surprise—Oyster was one of the major players in the e-book subscription space along with San Francisco startup Scribd and Amazon, which offers all-you-can eat reading through Kindle Unlimited. Unlike Amazon, however, Oyster had the backing of the Big Five publishers—Hachette, HarperCollins, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster—who offered their books on the service. (The Big Five also work with Scribd.) The e-book subscription business model is based on paying publishers a sum of money after “a fair portion” of a book is read, as well as sharing anonymized reading activity with publishers to help them target readers.”

Unfortunately, this is not a surprise. With better services out there (*cough* your public library), these type of online book subscriptions don’t appear to have a viable future. Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited and Scribd are still continuing, but you have to wonder for how long.

To read the full article, you can find it here.

E-Book Sales Decline Due To New Amazon Contracts

I thought this news report would mix well with this week’s Weekly Tea Discussion.

As reported by the Wall Street Journal:

When the world’s largest publishers struck e-book distribution deals with Amazon.com Inc. over the past several months, they seemed to get what they wanted: the right to set the prices of their titles and avoid the steep discounts the online retail giant often applies.

But in the early going, that strategy doesn’t appear to be paying off. Three big publishers that signed new pacts with AmazonLagardere SCA’s Hachette Book Group, News Corp ’s HarperCollins Publishers and CBS Corp. ’s Simon & Schuster—reported declining e-book revenue in their latest reporting periods.

“The new business model for e-books is having a significant impact on what [the big] publishers report,” said one publishing executive. “There’s no question that publishers’ net receipts have gone down.”

A recent snapshot of e-book prices found that titles in the Kindle bookstore from the five biggest publishers cost, on average, $10.81, while all other 2015 e-books on the site had an average price of $4.95, according to industry researcher Codex Group LLC.

“Since book buyers expect the price of a Kindle e-book to be well under $9, once you get to over $10 consumers start to say, ‘Let me think about that,’” said Codex CEO Peter Hildick-Smith.”

If you noticed by the infograph created by the newspaper, you really see no difference in pricing between an e-book and a hardcover:

This is why my purchasing of ebooks has decreased. There really isn’t that much of a difference. You might as well buy the hard copy.

Publishers fought so hard for the right to set e-book prices. They won but I can’t help but think they ended up being the losers in the situation.

As publishers game out e-book pricing, the stakes are high for authors and agents. “I want my clients’ books to be sold for as high a value as possible, but the important word is sold,” said Richard Pine, an agent at Inkwell Management.”

To read the full article, you can find it here.

Weekly Tea Discussion: Online Book Subscriptions

Books_Cups_Grass_Tea_CupWith all the recent news surrounding this issue, I thought it would be a perfect discussion topic for this week.

It was bound to happen. When the popularity of the streaming service, Netflix started to increase, very likely someone would come out and say, “what about a subscription service for books?” This allure of having unlimited access to certain products or form of entertainment was bound to approach our beloved books. So let’s take the time to list the book subscription services that are catching up with the trend:

https://i0.wp.com/publishingperspectives.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Kindle-Unlimited.pngKindle Unlimited: For $9.99 a month, you have unlimited access to 800,000 books and over a thousand audiobooks that is accessible to any device.

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Oyster Unlimited: Unlimited access for $9.95/month to over 1 million bestsellers and also has an Oyster store where you can purchase a book that is not under the Oyster Unlimited program.

https://i1.wp.com/the-digital-reader.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/scribd1.jpg

Scribd: Unlimited books, audiobooks, and comics on any device …all for $8.99/month.

Those are just to name a few.

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