Happy Independent Bookstore Day 2020!

Credit: IBD

Happy Independent Bookstore Day! This is a great event that celebrates indie bookstores across the United States on the last day of April. With the world in upheaval, however, the event was pushed back to this month. People are encouraged to visit and support their local bookstore, but if people are still skittish to have any form of interaction with people, don’t fret! There are some great virtual events to help celebrate this great day!

Continue reading “Happy Independent Bookstore Day 2020!”

Friday Debate: Women and Fantasy

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:

Continue reading “Friday Debate: Women and Fantasy”

Friday Debate: E-book Access

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:

Continue reading “Friday Debate: E-book Access”

Friday Debate: Amazon Books

Friday Deabte

Welcome to Friday Debate, a feature on cup of tea with that book, please, where every Friday a question will be posted that tantalize the brain and expands our horizons. For this week’s question:  Continue reading “Friday Debate: Amazon Books”

Problems of an Overworked Librarian #64

When a economist says that Amazon can replace the roles of libraries…

crazy GIF

 

 

 

Why I Don’t Shop at Barnes & Noble

A few days ago, an editorial was published in the New York Times depicting the deep trouble Barnes & Noble is truly in and why, more than ever, the retail book chain needs to be saved. Across the web and the blog-sphere, writers and book lovers a like are urging that we need all that we can do to save a company that is literally the last book chain in the United States. There is strong encouragement now, to shop at Barnes & Noble  more and support their future.

I must be in the minority because that is not going to happen for me. Continue reading “Why I Don’t Shop at Barnes & Noble”

Amazon Introduces Prime Book Box, A Subscription Service for Kids

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Amazon to Introduce Prime Box for Kids Credit: Amazon

Amazon is returning back to their bookseller roots.

This past Tuesday, the online retailer introduced a new service, Prime Book Box, a subscription service that offers organized boxes of hardcover books for kids up to age 12. Customers can choose whether to receive the boxes either every one, two, or three months. The service cost $23 a box, which according to Amazon, customers will save 35% off the list price.

Continue reading “Amazon Introduces Prime Book Box, A Subscription Service for Kids”

Indie Booksellers Outraged Over Decision to Launch “Marlon Bundo” on Amazon

Marlon Bundo maybe making the bestseller list but to some independent booksellers, they feel were not given the chance to reap the benefits. Continue reading “Indie Booksellers Outraged Over Decision to Launch “Marlon Bundo” on Amazon”

Amazon Books Won’t Bring Indie Bookstores to Their Knees

Amazon Books in New York
Amazon Books: Located at The Shops at Columbus Circle, New York, NY

When I first heard that Amazon was opening bookstores, this was my initial reaction:

 dog what omg scared confused GIF

By creating their online business, Amazon has cornered a huge market of book buying which most of the purchasing is done online. So why would Amazon take the risk of opening a brick and mortar bookstore, especially when a lot of them have been closing and people continue to fear their extinction?

Continue reading “Amazon Books Won’t Bring Indie Bookstores to Their Knees”

E-Book Sales Decline Due To New Amazon Contracts

I thought this news report would mix well with this week’s Weekly Tea Discussion.

As reported by the Wall Street Journal:

When the world’s largest publishers struck e-book distribution deals with Amazon.com Inc. over the past several months, they seemed to get what they wanted: the right to set the prices of their titles and avoid the steep discounts the online retail giant often applies.

But in the early going, that strategy doesn’t appear to be paying off. Three big publishers that signed new pacts with AmazonLagardere SCA’s Hachette Book Group, News Corp ’s HarperCollins Publishers and CBS Corp. ’s Simon & Schuster—reported declining e-book revenue in their latest reporting periods.

“The new business model for e-books is having a significant impact on what [the big] publishers report,” said one publishing executive. “There’s no question that publishers’ net receipts have gone down.”

A recent snapshot of e-book prices found that titles in the Kindle bookstore from the five biggest publishers cost, on average, $10.81, while all other 2015 e-books on the site had an average price of $4.95, according to industry researcher Codex Group LLC.

“Since book buyers expect the price of a Kindle e-book to be well under $9, once you get to over $10 consumers start to say, ‘Let me think about that,’” said Codex CEO Peter Hildick-Smith.”

If you noticed by the infograph created by the newspaper, you really see no difference in pricing between an e-book and a hardcover:

This is why my purchasing of ebooks has decreased. There really isn’t that much of a difference. You might as well buy the hard copy.

Publishers fought so hard for the right to set e-book prices. They won but I can’t help but think they ended up being the losers in the situation.

As publishers game out e-book pricing, the stakes are high for authors and agents. “I want my clients’ books to be sold for as high a value as possible, but the important word is sold,” said Richard Pine, an agent at Inkwell Management.”

To read the full article, you can find it here.