Make the Best of Your Summer: Summer Reads of 2021

Scouring the web for great reads for the summer? Well, your search is over! Here at cup of tea with that book, please have great reads that will make the best out of your summer! Whether you are staying in with the cool air conditioned or basking in the sun at your favorite beach, these great reads will make you forget where you are altogether and give you the real escapism you strive for this summer season. Make sure to check them out!

Fiction

Unsettled Ground by Claire Fuller

Unsettled Ground is a heart-stopping novel of betrayal and resilience, love and survival. It is a portrait of life on the fringes of society that explores with dazzling emotional power how we can build our lives on broken foundations, and spin light from darkness. (Credit: Fig Tree)

Peaces by Helen Oyeyemi

A spellbinding tale from a star author, Peaces is about what it means to be seen by another person–whether it’s your lover or a stranger on a train–and what happens when things you thought were firmly in the past turn out to be right beside you. (Credit: Riverhead Books)

Heaven by Mieko Kawakami

Kawakami’s simple yet profound new work stands as a dazzling testament to her literary talent. There can be little doubt that it has cemented her reputation as one of the most important young authors working to expand the boundaries of contemporary Japanese literature. (Credit: Europa Editions)

Circus of Wonders by Elizabeth Macneal

Moving from the pleasure gardens of Victorian London to the battle-scarred plains of the Crimea, Circus of Wonders is an astonishing story about power and ownership, fame and the threat of invisibility. (Credit: Picador Books)

The Other Black Girl by Zakiya Dalila Harris

A whip-smart and dynamic thriller and sly social commentary that is perfect for anyone who has ever felt manipulated, threatened, or overlooked in the workplace, The Other Black Girl will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very last twist. (Credit: Atria Books)

Mrs. England by Stacey Halls

Simmering with slow-burning menace, Mrs England is a portrait of an Edwardian marriage, weaving an enthralling story of men and women, power and control, courage, truth and the very darkest deception. Set against the atmospheric landscape of West Yorkshire, Stacey Halls’s third novel proves her one of the most exciting and compelling new storytellers of our times. (Credit: Bonnier Press)

The Startup Wife by Tahmima Anam

In this gripping, blistering novel, award-winning author Tahmima Anam takes on faith and the future with a gimlet eye and a deft touch. Come for the radical vision of human connection, stay for the wickedly funny feminist look at startup culture and modern partnership. Can technology—with all its limits and possibilities—disrupt love? (Credit: Scribner Book Company)

Mrs. Death Misses Death by Salena Godden

Tired of her job and desperate for a sympathetic ear, Death befriends a writer who begins to work on her memoir in this much-awaited, tantalizing debut novel from poet Salena Godden. (Credit: Canongate Books Ltd )

Redder Days by Sue Rainsford

Dazzling, unsettling and incredibly moving, Redder Days is a stunning exploration of the consequences of corrupted power, the emotional impact of abandonment, and the endurance of humanity in the most desperate of situations. (Credit: Doubleday)

The Betrayals by Bridget Collins

A highly imaginative and intricately crafted literary epic, The Betrayals confirms Bridget Collins as one of the most inventive and exquisite new voices in speculative fiction. (Credit: William Morrow & Company)


Mysteries & Thrillers

Finlay Donovan is Killing It by Elle Cosimano

Fast-paced, deliciously witty, and wholeheartedly authentic in depicting the frustrations and triumphs of motherhood in all its messiness, hilarity, and heartfelt moment, Finlay Donovan Is Killing It is the first in a brilliant new series from YA Edgar Award nominee Elle Cosimano. (Credit: Minotaur Books)

A Peculiar Combination by Ashley Weaver

The first in the new Electra McDonnell series from Edgar-nominated author Ashley Weaver, set in England during World War II, is a delightful mystery filled with spies, murder, romance, and the author’s signature wit. (Credit: Minotaur Books)

Mirrorland by Carole Johnstone

A twisty, dark, and brilliantly crafted thriller about love and betrayal, redemption and revenge, Mirrorland is a propulsive, page-turning debut about the power of imagination and the price of freedom. (Credit: Scribner Book & Company)

Every Last Fear by Alex Finlay

Told through multiple points-of-view and alternating between past and present, Alex Finlay’s Every Last Fear is not only a page-turning thriller, it’s also a poignant story about a family managing heartbreak and tragedy, and living through a fame they never wanted. (Credit: Minotaur Books)

The Last Thing to Burn by Will Dean

On an isolated farm in the United Kingdom, a woman is trapped by the monster who kidnapped her seven years ago. When she discovers she is pregnant, she resolves to protect her child no matter the cost, and starts to meticulously plan her escape. But when another woman is brought into the fold on the farm, her plans go awry. Can she save herself, her child, and this innocent woman at the same time? Or is she doomed to spend the remainder of her life captive on this farm? (Credit: Atria/Emily Bestler Books)

Exit by Belinda Bauer

Belinda Bauer continues to redefine the boundaries of crime fiction, with a novel that is part murder mystery, part coming-of-old-age story–however short that future may be. With the compassion and dark humor of Jonas Jonasson and the twisted thriller plotting of Rear Window, Exit is a novel readers will not soon forget. (Credit: Atlantic Monthly Press)

The Jigsaw Man by Nadine Matheson

Drawing on her experience as a criminal attorney, debut novelist Nadine Matheson delivers the page-turning crime novel of the year. Taut, vivid and addictively sinister, The Jigsaw Man will leave you breathless until the very last page. (Credit: Hanover Square Press)

The Downstairs Neighbor by Helen Cooper

An addicting and twisty debut about an apartment building devastated by the disappearance of a teenage girl–and by the secrets that won’t be kept behind each closed door–that will thrill fans of Lisa Jewell and Shari Lapena. (Credit: G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

The Khan by Saima Mir

Successful London lawyer Jia Khan is a long way from the grubby Northern streets she knew as a child, where her father, Akbar Khan, led the Pakistani community and ran the local organised crime syndicate. Often his Jirga rule – the old way – was violent and bloody, but it was always justice of a kind.

Now, with her father murdered, Jia must return to take his place. The police have always relied on the Khan to maintain the fragile order of the streets. But a bloody power struggle has broken out among warring communities and nobody is safe.

Justice needs to be restored, and Jia is about to discover that justice always comes at a cost. (Credit: Oneworld Publications)

The Shape of Darkness by Laura Purcell

A struggling silhouette artist in Victorian Bath seeks out a renowned child spirit medium in order to speak to the dead – and to try and identify their killers – in this beguiling new tale from the queen of Gothic fiction, Laura Purcell. (Credit: Penguin Books)


Young Adult

The Crossing by Manjeet Mann

A trailblazing new novel about two teenagers from opposite worlds; The Crossing is a profound story of hope, grief, and the very real tragedies of the refugee crisis. (Credit: Penguin UK)

Ace of Spades by Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé

With heart-pounding suspense and relevant social commentary comes a high-octane thriller from debut author Faridah Àbíké-Íyímídé. (Credit: Feiwel & Friends)

Destination Anywhere by Sara Barnard

Perfect for fans of Morgan Matson and Sarah Dessen, this lushly written and heart-wrenching novel follows a teen girl on a one-way trip away from her life and slowly reveals what made her leave it all behind. (Credit: Simon Schuster Books for Young Readers)

Boy, Everywhere by A. M. Dassu

Based on the experiences of real Syrian refugees, this thoughtful middle-grade novel is the rare book to delve deeply into this years-long crisis. Portions of the proceeds of this book will be used to benefit Syrian refugees in the UK and to set up a grant to support an unpublished refugee or immigrant writer in the US. Sami’s story is one of survival, of family and friendship, of bravery and longing … Sami could be any one of us. (Credit: Tu Books)

The Yearbook by Holly Bourne

Paige is used to staying quiet in the face of lies. Like how popular girl Grace is a such an amazing person (lie). How Laura steals people’s boyfriends (lie). How her own family are so perfect (lie).

Now Grace and friends have picked their “best” high-school moments for Paige to put in the all-important Yearbook. And they’re not just lies. They’re poison.

But Paige has finally had enough. And as she starts to find love through the pages of a book, she finds her voice too. Now she is going to rewrite her story – and the Yearbook is the perfect place to do it. (Credit: Usborne Publishing)

Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson

The highly anticipated sequel to the instant New York Times bestseller, A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder More dark secrets are exposed in this addictive, true-crime fueled mystery. (Credit: Delacorte Press)

The Broken Raven by Joseph Elliott

This second book in the Shadow Skye trilogy continues to expand the definition of hero as its neurodiverse heroine tackles ever greater challenges in a thrilling middle act to the battle over the fate of Scotia. (Credit: Walker Books US)

Things To Do Before The End of the World by Emily Barr

Olivia struggles to live her real life as fully as she wants to. She plans out conversations and events in her head but actually doing them and interacting with other people is hard. When the news breaks that humans have done such damage to the earth that there’s only nine months of safe air left everybody makes bucket lists and starts living their best lives – everyone, that is, but Olivia who is still struggling to figure out who she wants to be.

Then out of the blue comes contact from a long-lost cousin Olivia didn’t even know exsisted. Natasha is everything Olivia wants to be and more. And as the girls meet up for their last summer on earth Olivia finds Natasha’s ease and self-confidence having a effect on her. But what if Natasha isn’t everything she first appears to be . . . ? (Credit: Penguin UK)

The Things We Don’t See by Savannah Brown

When fledgling singer Roxy Raines vanishes from the tiny resort of Sandown, the island’s locals refuse to talk about it to any outsiders, dismissing Roxy as a teenage runaway.

Thirty years later, seventeen-year-old Mona Perry is convinced there’s something more sinister at play. Armed with a suitcase and a microphone – to record her findings for her podcast’s listeners – the troubled teen is on a deadline: one hot summer is all she has to get to the bottom of Roxy’s story.

But as Mona gets drawn into the strange goings on of this isolated community, it becomes clear that nothing is as it seems. Least of all Mona’s own past, and the disappearance of someone else, someone much closer to her…

How far will she go to uncover the truth? (Credit: Penguin UK)

Heartstopper Vol. 4 by Alice Oseman

Charlie didn’t think Nick could ever like him back, but now they’re officially boyfriends. Charlie’s beginning to feel ready to say those three little words: I love you.

Nick’s been feeling the same, but he’s got a lot on his mind – not least coming out to his dad, and the fact that Charlie might have an eating disorder.

As summer turns to autumn and a new school year begins, Charlie and Nick are about to learn a lot about what love means. (Credit: Hachette Children’s Group)



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