Summer Reads for an “Indoor” Summer: Teen/YA

For the month of August, I’ll be listing great summer reads, in different genres, that will give you a headstart on your summer adventure. So sit back in your lounge chair and getting ready to start your tantalizing journey!

Need reads to get your teenage readers to start reading…or are you an adult reader who can’t get enough of the young adult genre? (no judgement!) Here are some great recent (and old favorites) YA books that will make you forget that summer is almost coming to an end:

Blood Moon by Lucy Cuthew

This is another one of those amazing books that teens definitely need to read. Instead of just slut shaming, it approaches a subject that society as a whole still consider to be a taboo subject…period shaming. Cuthew approaches this important topic with both articulation and creativity that makes this story one compelling and intriguing novel. I loved how Cuthew how judgement and and stereotyping can come from both sides of the gender , really revealing the real provocative truths that people have internally about something that is completely normal. I just loved every minute of this book!

Eight Pieces of Silva by Patrice Lawrence

Becks is into girls but didn’t come out because she was never in. She lives with her mum, stepdad and eighteen-year-old Silva, her stepdad’s daughter. Becks and Silva are opposites, but bond over their mutual obsession with K-pop.

When Becks’ mum and stepdad go on honeymoon to Japan, Becks and Silva are left alone. Except, Silva disappears. Becks ventures into the forbidden territory of Silva’s room and finds the first of eight clues that help her discover her sister’s secret life.

Meanwhile, Silva is on a journey. A journey to make someone love her. He says he doesn’t, but he’s just joking. All she has to do is persuade him otherwise … (Credit: Hodder Children’s Books)

The Last Witness by Claire McFall

Heather agrees to a group camping holiday with Dougie and his friends because she’s desperate to get closer to him. But when the two of them disturb a pagan burial site above the beach, she becomes certain that they have awoken a malevolent spirit. Something is alive out there in the pitch-black dark, and it is planning to seek deadly revenge.

One year later, Heather knows she was very lucky to escape Black Cairn Point, but she is still waiting for Dougie to wake up from his coma. If he doesn’t, how will she prove her sanity—and her innocence? (Credit: Sourcebooks Fire)

Harrow Lake by Kat Ellis

Welcome to Harrow Lake. Someone’s expecting you . . .

Lola Nox is the daughter of a celebrated horror filmmaker – she thinks nothing can scare her.

But when her father is brutally attacked in their New York apartment, she’s swiftly packed off to live with a grandmother she’s never met in Harrow Lake, the eerie town where her father’s most iconic horror movie was shot.

The locals are weirdly obsessed with the film that put their town on the map – and there are strange disappearances, which the police seem determined to explain away.

And there’s someone – or something – stalking her every move.

The more Lola discovers about the town, the more terrifying it becomes. Because Lola’s got secrets of her own. And if she can’t find a way out of Harrow Lake, they might just be the death of her. (Credit: Penguin)

Beautiful Broken Things by Sara Barnard

Best friends Caddy and Rosie are inseparable. Their differences have brought them closer, but as she turns sixteen Caddy begins to wish she could be a bit more like Rosie – confident, funny and interesting. Then Suzanne comes into their lives: beautiful, damaged, exciting and mysterious, and things get a whole lot more complicated. As Suzanne’s past is revealed and her present begins to unravel, Caddy begins to see how much fun a little trouble can be. But the course of both friendship and recovery is rougher than either girl realises, and Caddy is about to learn that downward spirals have a momentum of their own. (Credit: Macmillan Children’s Books)

The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta

I absolutely loved this one! It was more than a book a teen coming in terms with his sexuality. It is a book about coming to terms about yourself, how you see yourself as a person. Dean Atta created a beautiful story that conveyed so much emotion and passion that any reader can identify with. Even though it was written in verse, it was done perfectly. Because of this technique, I could feel Michael’s pain and jubilation when he is coming to terms with his soul. Because of that amazing character development, this makes this YA novel one of the best I have read so far and of course this year. And the poetry? So much beauty and emotion! Spot on!

The Burning by Laura Bates

Anna and her mother have moved hundreds of miles to put the past behind them. Anna hopes to make a fresh start and escape the harassment she’s been subjected to. But then rumors and whispers start, and Anna tries to ignore what is happening by immersing herself in learning about Maggie, a local woman accused of witchcraft in the seventeenth century. A woman who was shamed. Silenced. And whose story has unsettling parallels to Anna’s own.

From Laura Bates, internationally renowned feminist and founder of the Everyday Sexism Project, comes a realistic fiction story for the #metoo era. It’s a powerful call to action, reminding all readers of the implications of sexism and the role we can each play in ending it. (Credit: Sourcebooks Fire)

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson

One of the best innovative and compelling YA thrillers I have read in a long time. If you are a fan of mystery genre but wary of YA, this is book that definitely makes the exception. It’s one compelling and intriguing mystery but also an examination of how media covers a high profile murder. Pip’s articulate and passionate nature is very identifiable. To me, she is the next Nancy Drew!

Eve of Man by Giovanna & Tom Fletcher

All her life Eve has been kept away from the opposite sex. Kept from the truth of her past.

But at sixteen it’s time for Eve to face her destiny. Three potential males have been selected for her. The future of humanity is in her hands. She’s always accepted her fate.

Until she meets Bram.

Eve wants control over her life. She wants freedom.

But how do you choose between love and the future of the human race? (Credit: Micahel Joeseph)

The Things She’s Seen by by Ambelin Kwaymullina and Ezekiel Kwaymullina

Nothing’s been the same for Beth Teller since the day she died.

Her dad is drowning in grief. He’s also the only one who has been able to see and hear her since the accident. But now she’s got a mystery to solve, a mystery that will hopefully remind her detective father that he is still alive, that there is a life after Beth that is still worth living.

Who is Isobel Catching, and why is she able to see Beth, too? What is her connection to the crime Beth’s father has been sent to investigate–a gruesome fire at a home for troubled youth that left an unidentifiable body behind? What happened to the people who haven’t been seen since the fire?

As Beth and her father unravel the mystery, they find a shocking and heartbreaking story lurking beneath the surface of a small town, and a friendship that lasts beyond one life and into another… (Credit: Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers)

The Good Hawk by Joseph Elliott

Agatha is a Hawk, brave and fierce, who protects her people by patrolling the high walls of their island home. She is proud of her job, though some in her clan whisper that it is meant to keep her out of the way because of the condition she was born with. Jaime, thoughtful and anxious, is an Angler, but he hates the sea. Worse, he’s been chosen for a duty that the clan hasn’t required for generations: to marry. The elders won’t say why they have promised him to a girl in a neighboring clan, but there are rumors of approaching danger.

When disaster strikes and the clan is kidnapped, it is up to Agatha and Jaime to travel across the haunted mainland of Scotia to Norveg, with help along the way from a clan of nomadic Highland bull riders and the many animals who are drawn to Agatha’s extraordinary gift of communication. Thrilling and dark yet rich with humor and compassion, this is the first book in the Shadow Skye trilogy, written by a wonderful new voice in fantasy and introducing a welcome new kind of hero. (Credit: Walker Books US)

All the Bad Apples by Moïra Fowley-Doyle

When Deena’s wild and mysterious sister Mandy disappears – presumed dead – her family are heartbroken. But Mandy has always been troubled. It’s just another bad thing to happen to Deena’s family. Only Deena refuses to believe it’s true.

And then the letters start arriving. Letters from Mandy, claiming that their family’s blighted history is not just bad luck or bad decisions – but a curse, handed down through the generations. Mandy has gone in search of the curse’s roots, and now Deena must find her. What they find will heal their family’s rotten past – or rip it apart forever. (Credit: Kathy Dawson Books)

Toffee by Sarah Crossan

Amazing…I don’t think I have enough words to describe how emotional and breathless this book was. Sarah Crossan has a true gift of creating a poignant story that resonates with you after you finished reading it. It expands on the different meaning of the word home, a word that we sometimes take for granted. Crossan explores the themes of mental health and friendship so beautifully that this thought provoking novel in verse will leave you astounded about life itself.

The Surface Breaks by Louise O’Neill

Deep beneath the sea, off the cold Irish coast, Gaia is a young mermaid who dreams of freedom from her controlling father. On her first swim to the surface, she is drawn towards a human boy. She longs to join his carefree world, but how much will she have to sacrifice? What will it take for the little mermaid to find her voice? Hans Christian Andersen’s original fairy tale is reimagined through a searing feminist lens, with the stunning, scalpel-sharp writing and world building that has won Louise her legions of devoted fans. A book with the darkest of undercurrents, full of rage and rallying cries: storytelling at its most spellbinding. (Credit: Scholastic)

And The Stars Were Burning Brightly by Danielle Jawando

When fifteen-year-old Nathan discovers that his older brother Al has taken his own life, his whole world is torn apart.
Al was special.
Al was talented.
Al was full of passion and light…so why did he do it?
Convinced that his brother was in trouble, Nathan begins to retrace his footsteps. And along the way, he meets Megan. Al’s former classmate, who burns with the same fire and hope, who is determined to keep Al’s memory alive. But when Nathan learns the horrifying truth behind his brother’s suicide, one question remains – how do you survive, when you’re growing up in the age of social media?
(Credit: Simon & Schuster)

Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron

Brody Fair feels like nobody gets him: not his overworked parents, not his genius older brother, and definitely not the girls in the projects set on making his life miserable. Then he meets Nico, an art student who takes Brody to Everland, a “knock-off Narnia” that opens its door at 11:21pm each Thursday for Nico and his band of present-day misfits and miscreants.

Here Brody finds his tribe and a weekly respite from a world where he feels out of place. But when the doors to Everland begin to disappear, Brody is forced to make a decision: He can say goodbye to Everland and to Nico, or stay there and risk never seeing his family again. (Credit: Macmillan Children’s Books)

Run Rebel by Manjeet Mann

When Amber runs, it’s the only time she feels completely free – far away from her claustrophobic home life. Her father wants her to be a dutiful daughter, waiting for an arranged marriage like her sister Ruby.

Running is a quiet rebellion. But Amber wants so much more – and she’s ready to fight for it.

It’s time for a revolution. (Credit: Penguin)

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