New Releases in Poetry

Are you big lover of poetry and want to explore some new ones for National Poetry Month? Here are some recent new releases that will have you wishing that National Poetry Month was all year round:

Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism

Edited by Danielle Barnhart and Iris Mahan

Creative activists have reacted to the 2016 Presidential election in myriad ways. Editors Danielle Barnhart and Iris Mahan have drawn on their profound knowledge of the poetry scene to put together an extraordinary list of poets taking a feminist stance against the new authority. What began as an informal collaboration of like-minded poets—to be released as a handbound chapbook—has grown into something far more substantial and ambitious: a fully fledged anthology of women’s resistance, with a portion of proceeds supporting Planned Parenthood and the Center for Reproductive Rights.

 I left nothing inside on purpose

by Stevie Howell

The highly anticipated second collection from the Irish-Canadian poet whose work has garnered international attention.

A Mother’s Book of Blessings: A Treasury of Wisdom for Life’s Greatest Moments

by Lena Tabori

Curated especially for mothers, this beautifully illustrated keepsake contains more than 100 blessings from around the world to celebrate life’s special moments and encourage reflection for the whole family.

Heart Talk: Poetic Wisdom for a Better Life

by Cleo Wade

A beautifully illustrated book from Cleo Wade—the artist, poet, and speaker who has been called “the Millennial Oprah” by New York Magazine—that offers creative inspiration and life lessons through poetry, mantras, and affirmations, perfect for fans of the bestseller Milk & Honey

The Witch Doesn’t Burn In This One

By Amanda Lovelace

The witch: supernaturally powerful, inscrutably independent, and now—indestructible. These moving, relatable poems encourage resilience and embolden women to take control of their own stories. Enemies try to judge, oppress, and marginalize her, but the witch doesn’t burn in this one.

Take Me with You

by Andrea Gibson

Andrea Gibson explores themes of love, gender, politics, sexuality, family, and forgiveness with stunning imagery and a fierce willingness to delve into the exploration of what it means to heal and to be different in this strange age. Take Me With You, illustrated throughout with evocative line drawings by Sarah J. Coleman, is small enough to fit in your bag, with messages that are big enough to wake even the sleepiest heart. Divided into three sections (love, the world, and becoming) of one liners, couplets, greatest hits phrases, and longer form poems, it has something for everyone, and will be placed in stockings, lockers, and the hands of anyone who could use its wisdom.

Bullets Into Bells: Poets & Citizens Respond to Gun Violence

Edited by Brian Clements, Alexandra Teague and Dean Rader

A powerful call to end American gun violence from celebrated poets and those most impacted, including a foreword by Gabrielle Giffords and Mark Kelly and an introduction by Colum McCann, published on the fifth anniversary of the Sandy Hook shooting.

Dreampad

by Jeff Latosik

Starting from an urge to reconcile the human need for stability with what’s happening in a constantly fluid “now,” Dreampad, Trillium Book Award for Poetry winner poet Jeff Latosik’s startling new collection, ponders whether an ideal for living is viable when we’re not sure we can say yes or no to anything in a world that’s growing increasingly ephemeral and entangled with the virtual.


Anecdotal Evidence

by Wendy Cope

Wendy Cope’s first collection of new poetry since 2011’s acclaimed Family Values, chosen as one of the Telegraph’s 15 Best Poetry Books of All Time.

Sea of Strangers

by Lang Leav

This completely original collection of poetry and prose will not only delight her avid fans but is sure to capture the imagination of a whole new audience. With the turn of every page, Sea of Strangers invites you to go beyond love and loss to explore themes of self-discovery and empowerment as you navigate your way around the human heart.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s